Inside UHW


Page updated July 7, 2010

UrbanHealthWatch.net Partners with Southern RI AHEC and WRIU 90.3 FM to Launch Urban Health Watch Radio
Originally posted June 29, 2010

RHODE ISLAND – Providence, Rhode Island-based blog, Urban Health Watch (UrbanHealthWatch.net), and Southern RI Area Health Education Center (AHEC) have united to launch Urban Health Watch Radio, a public awareness campaign and radio program on 90.3 FM, WRIU – a broadcast service of the University of Rhode Island and a station that can be heard throughout Southern Rhode Island as well as other areas of the state; parts of Massachusetts, Connecticut and Long Island, NY; and worldwide or from anywhere via an Internet webcast. The goal of Urban Health Watch Radio is to provide actionable steps that people can use everyday by extending health education into the community and delivering culturally appropriate messages about public health.

UrbanHealthWatch.net is managed by the Urban League of RI, an affiliate of the National Urban League, and funded by a Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant offered by the Rhode Island Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Urban Health Watch Radio is made possible by a grant from Southern Rhode Island Area Health Education Center (AHEC), an organization striving to, among other goals, increase the interaction of health professionals with communities in southern Rhode Island.

For more information, click here to keep reading, email urbanhealthri@gmail.com, or call 401-351-5000 extension 119.

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UHW Launches Multimedia Campaign and Name-Change for
Health Awareness in April

Originally posted April 8, 2010


UrbanHealthWatch.net is a blog managed by the Urban League of RI and funded by a Preventive Health and Health Services partnership between the RI Department of Health and the CDC. For more information, email urbanhealthri@gmail.com.

PROVIDENCE, RI – As part of the month-long health-related activities and events held annually in April, producers of the health blog, UrbanHealthWatch.net, will hold a community film event and discussion group as well as host short movies on their website. Also being proposed and implemented on the blog is the use of “Health Equity Awareness Month” to describe the month’s activities – in the place of the traditionally used “Minority Health Awareness” title.

Urban Health Watch is a blog cofounded in the summer of 2009 by Michelle Wilson, Director of Community Services of the Urban League of Rhode Island and the site’s editor, Reza C. Clifton. The purpose of the project is to address several objectives, including to bring health education into the community, deliver culturally appropriate messages on how to prevent and manage chronic diseases, and to translate medical research about health promotion and disease prevention into actionable steps people can use everyday in life. The blog is funded through a Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant offered through the RI Department of Health (HEALTH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

The idea to show and post films in April is based, in part, on recognition of those in the community, even those with regular health providers, who may prefer or better retain information through visual learning. It is also in response to a successful campaign by HEALTH in 2009 to get members of the community viewing and discussing the health documentary, “Unnatural Causes.” The film sparked dialogue and a better understanding among viewers of important topics like cultural competence, social determinants of health, and why health disparities matter. One of the action steps many took away from the film was the need for more action to advance health equity, a phrase that denotes the types of practices and policy-changes required to truly address “minority health.”

Click here to keep reading.

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Available Now: Our Stories, Our Bodies, Our Lives and
Urban Health Watch in She Shines Magazine

Originally posted April 6, 2010


Below is an excerpt from the 2010 Minority Health edition of She Shines, a magazine published by YWCA Northern RI. Click here to read the full article and the entire issue.

Minority Health:
Our Stories, Our Bodies, Our Lives

by Reza Corinne Clifton

WASHINGTON, DC – The room was humming with voices and filled with a variety of colors – as you would expect at a conference that’s attracted hundreds. But as introductions began and the next speaker took the stage, the crowd became quiet; I was in the audience that day, among those who became transfixed. It was January 28, 2010, and it was the annual Health Action “Grassroots” Conference held by the national health advocacy organization, Families USA.

In a demeanor completely absent of histrionics, Congresswoman Donna Edwards, a Representative from Maryland, told the audience her own health story. It is one that starts with a career shift and corresponding inability to pay for COBRA, the temporary health insurance provided by certain employers after a person has lost his or her job. While able to acquire insurance for her son, “I crossed my fingers,” she says as what she chose for herself. Eventually she felt sick; in fact “sicker and sicker,” she recalled, until the day she passed out at a grocery store to then be rushed to the Emergency Room.

In some ways she was lucky, she describes, because there was no withholding of treatment in relation to her insurance status. But that luck would soon run out as thousands of dollars in hospital bills arrived, followed by debates about which bills to pay and, eventually, the foreclosure notices. “My personal experience shows,” concludes Edwards, “what we might have today, we might not have tomorrow.” Or the day after that, as was clear from her journey to medical and financial recovery represented in her visible presence and stature that day.

Keep reading the article, and see the entire “Minority Health” issue by visiting SheShines.org. Or click here to download it directly. The edition includes interviews and features with “a variety of community health workers a trusted health reporter, and those working closely in neighborhoods and community centers,” including co-founders of Urban Health Watch.

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Continue the Discussion: Urban Health Watch on Facebook
Posted Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Up late at night? Ready for a wider conversation? Join UrbanHealthWatch.net on Facebook.

Share your ideas for discussion, post your own events, and be part of the solution.

Click on the photo or here to become a “fan” on Facebook.

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HOW CAN WE HELP YOU WITH HEALTH REFORM:
AN URBAN HEALTH WATCH SURVEY

Posted Monday, March 22, 2010
Click here to take the online survey.

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How can Urban Health Watch help you?
Take the quick survey and let us know.
Posted November 17, 2009

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Pictures from the New England Regional Minority Health Conference

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ABOUT URBAN HEALTH WATCH

Urban Health Watch (UrbanHealthWatch.net) is a project managed by the Urban League of Rhode Island and edited/run by Reza Corinne Clifton, an award-winning journalist and multimedia producer. It is funded by the Rhode Island Prevention Block Grant, a program of the Rhode Island Department of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Urban Heath Watch is part of a strategy to address several objectives:

– To bring health education into the community and deliver culturally appropriate messages on how to prevent and manage chronic diseases.

– To analyze, package, and disseminate public health and medical information through collaborations with traditional centers of influence that are considered trusted environments and provide accessibility to target populations.

– To build the capacity of neighborhood organizations, churches and leaders to initiate health promotion and disease prevention activities.

– To translate medical research and findings about health promotion and disease prevention into actionable steps people can use everyday in life.

– To disseminate medical research findings and best practices through the media and other sources to raise the visibility and credibility of an expanded view of health.